Austin City Limits Music Festival 2010 Billy Draws Two consists of Billy Horn 25 (Niagara Falls, N.Y.) , lead vocals, guitar, harmonica and songwriter, Doug Krell, 26, (Youngstown, N.Y.), rhythm guitar, backing vocals and bass, Rosie Lorentti, 20, (Lewiston, N.Y.), bass and backing vocals and piano and Chris McClellen, 23, (Buffalo, N.Y.), drums. Trade indexes not individual stocks - Indexes generally have much lower volatility than individual stocks and for this reason, I rarely use this strategy on individual stocks. Using FFIV as a recent example, on one particular day, there was a negative news report and the stock dropped about 20%. While possible, it is incredibly rare that you would see an index fall by this much in a single day, but it occurs more regularly with individual stocks especially tech or small caps stocks. The bid-ask spread is also lower for indexes meaning you are not suffering a liquidity premium. Taking Woodstock: Rated R for graphic nudity, some sexual content, drug use and language. 120 mins. A comedy based on the real-life story of Elliot Tiber (Demetri Martin), whose family was involved in making the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival happen. The bank is about to foreclose on the family motel and Elliot moves back home to help his parents. When he learns the permit for the festival wristbands in a neighboring town has been cancelled, he contacts the producers and tries to drum up some business for the motel. Three weeks later half a million people are on their way to his neighbor"s farm and his life will be forever changed. You do not need to hold the event in person. You can conduct it virtually over the telephone teleconference or Web webinar You might sport wristbands decide on using guest speakers or have a live discussion. There is a special "Holiday Wishes" fireworks show and our family favorite "Mickey"s Once Upon a Christmastime" parade, which are both spectacular. The only time you will be able to see these shows are during the Christmas Party and between the extremely busy and extremely expensive Christmas week. That week between Christmas and New Years is the busiest of the year for the Magic Kingdom, and often closes due to capacity not long after opening in the morning! Many masks are based on the event wristbands that you are going to. You may want to make a mask that is much more flamboyant for Mardi Gras or are you may want an elegant mask for that formal event. You need to figure out some of the colors and basic themes that you want to use. Some of the things that you may need to create your masterpiece is some kind of craft glue, feathers, sequins, glitter, gemstones, and anything else that you might need. You may want to purchase sticks or dow rods to complete your mask. Do not forget you will need some kind of elastic or ribbon to be able to wear the mask. Americans celebrate various festivals annually. So if you wear a wristband on the festival day, you will remember the day even after it has gone and feel happy about it. Another occasion is Christmas which is celebrated with great bliss and excitement. If you wear silicone wristbands that has messages like "Keep Christ in Christmas" and "Just Say Merry Christmas" will help you and others to take part in Christmas celebrations. The Final Destination: Rated R for strong violent/gruesome accidents, language and a scene of sexuality. The fourth film in the series has a teenager avoiding death at a racetrack. Like those before him, he learns the hard way that death will not be jilted. The director and writer behind the second Final Destination are reunited for this installment.

He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in China. [Photo/Agencies]

They say laws are needed to provide better control of emerging field

The controversy over gene-edited twins has heightened the urgent need for specific laws regulating assisted reproductive technologies, experts said on Tuesday.

Zhai Xiaomei, a professor and executive director of the Center for Bioethics of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, said the country"s regulatory framework in the field mainly consists of guidelines issued by government departments.

Relevant laws, with clear-cut penalties, remain absent. Stipulations in guidelines do not carry the power to impose legal penalties when people break ethical rules, Zhai said, adding that the loophole must be plugged by introducing specific laws that will deter wrongdoing and penalize violators.

Zhai is in Hong Kong attending the second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, which kicked off on Tuesday. She is a member of the summit"s organizing committee.

She made the remarks as shock waves reverberated around the world after Monday"s claims by Chinese biological researcher He Jiankui related to the birth of a pair of gene-edited twin girls. The announcement triggered outcries from the public and the academia over research ethics.

Qiu Renzong, a professor at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said He"s research was unethical and contravened relevant regulations issued by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the previous Ministry of Health - now the National Health Commission. The regulations stipulate that no genetically modified embryo may be implanted into the reproductive organs of a human or animal.

Given the current state of the law, however, what the researcher did was not against the law, according to Qiu, who is also in Hong Kong for the genome summit.

Another serious question, Zhai said, involves the mechanism by which an ethics review board was set up and how it gave He the green light to carry out his research.

It was widely reported that the review board for He"s research was from a private hospital in Shenzhen, which denied having done so.

It would be inappropriate for a hospital-level review board to grant authority to conduct an ethics review of gene-editing, Zhai said, adding that a national-level review board should be in place to examine any experiment on genes and embryos.

However, some scientists have also cautioned that overregulation may risk slowing down gene research and related technology development in China. Wei Wensheng, a researcher in Peking University"s College of Life Sciences who is also attending the summit, said he worried there might be a backlash calling for a ban on the application of such technologies in China.

Wei said gene editing is an effective tool in treating serious genetic diseases, but He"s case has frightened the public, so there could be repercussions.

"It is completely unnecessary to edit the genes for HIV prevention. There are other alternatives that have proved far safer than gene editing to achieve the goal," said Wei, who thought what He did was for fame and money, not for academic improvement.

Qiu suggested that genome editing should meet a set of preconditions, including preclinical trials - nonhuman animal research in particular - and basic research to improve genome editing techniques.

Qiu urged relevant societies such as the Chinese Medical Association and Chinese Society for Genetics and Medical Genetics to develop ethical guidelines.

For China"s National Health Commission, Qiu suggested it develop specific regulations on applying genome editing in human reproduction, establish a licensing system, conduct double ethics reviews both by institutions and peers and setting up a protocol to examine and assess the results of any institutional review.